INDONESIAN HYPERCUISINE

Make Bandung stop on your travel and check out French-artist Enora Lalet’s hybrid food-explorations and –creations. Her recurring favorite strategy called “Cooking Faces” is plumbing the depth on borders and tendencies of cultural identity concepts based on local cuisine in transition. Follow Enora Lalet on her latest discoveries through the Indonesian culinary-scene at Selasar Sunaryo art space in Bandung/West java.

First we need feed, then we eat, then we build rituals around gastronomy. (Enora Lalet)

 

INDONESIAN “COOKING FACES”

Since 2008 Enora Lalet questions how local cuisine is shaping cultural understanding and how it is changing within a hypercultural reality. The self-called visual food artist developed a creative practice to make close-up portraits of models, wearing self-made accessory, made out of locally discovered food-material. Inspired by “typical” Indonesian ingredients, tropical fruits or even instant noodles (which unfortunately became important part of Indonesian food culture), she creates a food-anthropological artistic approach out of a pool of hyper-cultural objects, textures, ornaments, colours and symbols.

 

Enora Lalet, Flag-mie for Bhineka Tunggal Ika (made out of Instant noodles), Photography, 75 x 100m, 2017

 

POP CULTURE MEETS INDONESIAN CRACKERS (KERUPUK)

Enora Lalet is interested in shapes, textures and flavours of her culinary found objects, which she’s transforming into a cultural hyperspace. Here creations are captured by the medium of photography in order to document her ephemeral artwork. Pop aesthetics on traditional Indonesian Batik backgrounds contrasts with local food-materials and traditional Indonesian dancing gestures. Jack- or dragon fruits, snow peas and sweat soy sauce next to French fries or donuts are used as painting- or sculptural materials and presented on (mostly) body-painted Indonesian faces. Furthermore Enora Lalet brings to the surface social issues oscillating between global and local, religion and local customs, when covering an Indonesian girls face with a burka made out of Indonesian crackers.

Jack Fruit Helmet by Enora Lalet

HYBRID FOOD-CREATIONS AS HYPERCULTURAL ART-PRACTICE

Without boundaries Enora Lalets artwork is unfolded in a space of simultaneity, of closenessand distance shifting between different cultural ideas, objects and customs. By using Byung-Chul Han’s concept of “Hyperculturality” as a term to describe contemporary cultural phenomena, Enora Lalet’s artistic Hypercuisine refers on a broad variety of cultural issues and questions displayed through a creative practice.

Die Hypercuisine nivelliert die Vielfalt der Esskulturen nicht. Sie wirft ja nicht alles blind in einen Topf. Vielmehr lebt sie von Unterschieden. Und sie kreiert neue Formen. (Byung-Chul Han 2005, p. 23.)

Hypercuisine doesn’t level the variety of gastronomic culture. It doesn’t throw everything blindly into a pot. Rather, it lives by differences. And it creates new forms. (Byung-Chul Han 2005, p. 23, translated by IndoSenia)

@ SELASAR SUNARYO ART SPACE IN BANDUNG

Enora Lalets exhibition is showcased at Selasar Sunaryo’s art space. Based in fresh Bandung, the arty hub is dedicated to contemporary art. One main purpose of Bandung’s top art space is to build links between Indonesian and international art. Selasar Sunaryo puts on dozens of interesting art exhibitions throughout the year. Take a look at their website or at IndoEvents to know what is going on there!

Where?    

Art Exhibition TATA BOGA by Enora Lalet (February 24 until March 19) @ Selasar Sunaryo Art Space Bandung

Jalan Bukit Pakar Timur No. 100, Bandung, 40198 West Java  ◊  http://selasarsunaryo.com (mostly in Indonesian Language, partly English)  ◊  info@selasarsunaryo.com  ◊  +62 22 250 7939

When?         

Tuesday – Sunday 10:00 – 17:00  ◊  Closed on Monday and National Holidays

How much?          

FREE entry

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *